hyperbole, et al

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Apr 06
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policymic:

Can you name these hip hop classics from 3-second clips?

Here are 15 three-second clips from the some of the most important hip-hop songs of all time. If you can recognize them all, you’re probably legit.

The first five should be super easy, the next five are more challenging and the final five are the deepest, significant cuts we could find.

Read the answers | Follow policymic

Feb 07
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Soul Food Friday with Des (at Pearl’s Place)

Soul Food Friday with Des (at Pearl’s Place)

Feb 06
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Phil Hoffman and I had two things in common. We were both fathers of young children, and we were both recovering drug addicts. Of course I’d known Phil’s work for a long time — since his remarkably perfect film debut as a privileged, cowardly prep-school kid in Scent of a Woman — but I’d never met him until the first table read for Charlie Wilson’s War, in which he’d been cast as Gust Avrakotos, a working-class CIA agent who’d fallen out of favor with his Ivy League colleagues. A 180-degree turn.

On breaks during rehearsals, we would sometimes slip outside our soundstage on the Paramount lot and get to swapping stories. It’s not unusual to have these mini-AA meetings — people like us are the only ones to whom tales of insanity don’t sound insane. “Yeah, I used to do that.” I told him I felt lucky because I’m squeamish and can’t handle needles. He told me to stay squeamish. And he said this: “If one of us dies of an overdose, probably 10 people who were about to won’t.” He meant that our deaths would make news and maybe scare someone clean.

So it’s in that spirit that I’d like to say this: Phil Hoffman, this kind, decent, magnificent, thunderous actor, who was never outwardly “right” for any role but who completely dominated the real estate upon which every one of his characters walked, did not die from an overdose of heroin — he died from heroin. We should stop implying that if he’d just taken the proper amount then everything would have been fine.

He didn’t die because he was partying too hard or because he was depressed — he died because he was an addict on a day of the week with a y in it. He’ll have his well-earned legacy — his Willy Loman that belongs on the same shelf with Lee J. Cobb’s and Dustin Hoffman’s, his Jamie Tyrone, his Truman Capote and his Academy Award. Let’s add to that 10 people who were about to die who won’t now.

Aaron Sorkin's obituary for Philip Seymour Hoffman in Time (via christinefriar)

(Source: popculturebrain, via christinefriar)

Jan 30
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Smell ya later, ASN!

Smell ya later, ASN!

Dec 30
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Helper Kitty (at Yojimbo’s Garage)

Helper Kitty (at Yojimbo’s Garage)

Dec 28
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Bea Bea! (at Big Green House)

Bea Bea! (at Big Green House)

Dec 19
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Pho Thursdays (at Tank Noodle)

Pho Thursdays (at Tank Noodle)

Dec 13
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coketalk:

I swear to all that is rhythmic and holy, Beyonce has created something of such monumental pop-cultural importance that the word “masterpiece” barely begins to describe this visual album.

I am in fucking awe — of her, of her music, of her videos — all of it. I’ve had these songs for less than a day, and they’ve already made me laugh, cry, and dance my face off, sometimes all three at once.

I really can’t even deal with how good this shit is.

One of the only contemporary albums I purchased this year. GIT IT BEY

Dec 10
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Dec 07
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aaronandthesea:

Cover of Lykke Li song “Little Bit.”